Mick Whitcomb

Springfield, MO

By means of soldering, welding, and dry joinery I create utilitarian sculptures by converting mechanical and scientific innovations from the 19th century into light fixtures using lighting technologies introduced in the mid-1880s by Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. Each piece is an abstraction from innovations of the Victorian time period to provoke in the viewer a sense of nostalgia and appreciation of the humble foundations of the various industries that we live by today.

David Talley

Tenants Harbor, ME

I have found that when a furniture design is sound and is optimal in the qualities of proportion, balance and harmony in regard to color, form, texture and figure, and that piece is well crafted, then the use of extraordinary woods and wood combinations can elevate the piece to the status of art. Accordingly, my current designs are intended to be more than just utilitarian but also to make a statement, to be "jewelry" for the home and office.

Bradford Smith

Worcester, PA

Over the past 30 years I have worked to develop a design language that is truly my own. A description of my style would be warm contemporary. In doing so, I have been able to create furniture that cannot be pigeonholed into an existing style. I achieve this through the use of solid hardwoods, recycled materials, good proportions, and old-fashioned usefulness. I find a warmth and history in each salvaged piece of lumber that I use. I want my furniture to not only tell a story, but also be the beginning of a new story.

Jo Roessler

Easthampton, MA

I design and handcraft custom and limited edition residential solid wood furniture. While my style has been variously described as modern, architectural, and Japanese-influenced, I eschew such neat categorizations of my work. I don’t have a rulebook or dogma about adhering to one particular style. I take my cues from everyday objects, nature, the world around me, something as basic as a leaf, simplicity and elegance on the surface, but with an amazing underlying complexity.

Luke Proctor

Mount Horeb, WI

I work with hand forged metal. I heat metal in my forge and then shape, bend, and form it into contemporary furniture. I use traditional blacksmith techniques and joinery. I also work with mica to create the shades for my lamps. All of the shades are finished with fabric on all the edges. I use a semi-translucent acrylic for my table tops and shelves.

James Pearce

Peoria, IL

My work is crafted entirely from wood. All parts are original and hand made. I do not use any reclaimed parts or metal in my pieces. All of my work is functional and can be adjusted in height with a turn of the crank.

Keunho (Peter) Park

Philadelphia, PA

I am an artist who works with visual images; sound, sculptural material to create 3D animated forms, functional objects, furniture, and musical instruments. My work is often about creating a sculptural object inspired by characteristic of the people I know, gesture of various creatures and life forms and narratives based on my love of music. I like to use wood as the main sculptural material and explore innovative ways with it to create forms that are humanly intuitive.

Paul Monfredo & Nancy McCormick

Seal Harbor, ME

We are a husband and wife team who together create decorative mirrors using images from the natural world, illuminated books, art history and architecture. While our materials and techniques are traditional and straightforwardly serious, our aim is whimsical and fun. We have been collaborating in this work for over twenty years and continue to explore and develop new images and techniques.

Jorgelina Lopez & Marco Duenas

Baltimore, MD

In the creative process we are inspired by geometric patterns, exploring structures and forms that we find in the principles in which nature is constructed. Influenced both from the Mid-Century design and traditional Japanese techniques, we create functional and three-dimensional work of art. Along with our lighting collection we design and make home accents to complete our body of work focused in home decor and unique functional object.

Richard Judd

Belleville, WI

This sculptural furniture uses a bent ply lamination process. The birch core is sustainably harvested. The high figure veneer faces are rotary sliced off the log for the most efficient use of this prized natural resource. I am inspired to share the story of conservation and creation of timeless classics.

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