Paveen "Beer" Chunhaswasdikul

GADSDEN, AL

I used to be an auto mechanic, and love all mechanical things. I enjoy designing and making one of a kind artworks that I call metal ware. These unique pieces are inspired from old rusty metal cans, flame throwers, machines, and engines that I find at yard sales and flea markets and then transform them into clay teapots. They are mostly thrown on the potter's wheel in sections, altered, and assembled with some slab made parts.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Teresa Chang

Philadelphia, PA

Functional craft has the potential to bring great beauty everyday life. As a practical ceramist who loves food, my passion for everyday tableware is natural. All work is made of porcelain thrown on the potter's wheel.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Rob Cartelli

SOUTH NEWFANE, VT

THE JANE AND LEONARD KORMAN FAMILY PRIZE FOR EXCELLENCE IN CLAY

Functional tableware is my canvas. I make pottery that is handled, moved to the table, the sink, then back to the cupboard. In this tactile cycle, my pottery communicates. It speaks of architecture, containment, service, earth elements, and human effort. From all aspects of my work I aim to convey a simple idea - look good, feel good, work well. And bring joy to the user while I’m at it.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Bennett Bean

BLAIRSTOWN, NJ

There are a number of ideas that I deal with in my work, and they are continually evolving. Presentation is one. How does one put an object into the world yet separate it from the world? My resolution of this formalist concern resulted in my use of black bases. Another concern is the idea of control, which in my case takes the form of refusing to let the fire have the last word. So, much of the embellishment of these pieces is done after the firing, i.e. the paint and the gold. And finally, beauty. There is a large amount of suffering in the world. If, when somebody sees my work they feel some pleasure, that is success.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Ryan J. Greenheck

Philadelphia, PA

A structured composition is vital within the framework of my vessels. The rim and feet of my pots are strongly defined areas, while the space in between lends itself to be broken down in parts. I incorporate a repeated pattern over the surface to assist in accentuating the volume within the forms. The surface of my vessels is constantly explored. Sensitivity in the glazing process must be attained in order to preserve the essence of the piece.

Jennifer McCurdy

Vineyard Haven, MA

I use a translucent porcelain body because it has a beautiful surface, and it can convey the qualities of light and shadow that I wish to express. After I throw my vessel on the potter’s wheel, I alter the form to set up a movement of soft shadow. When the porcelain is leather hard, I carve patterns to add energy and counterpoint. In further exploration, I marry the fine porcelain with the ancient art of gilding. The 23 carat gold leaf illumines the interior of the vessel, to reveal new curves and patterns.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Autumn Cipala

Rockland, ME

My work is made of translucent porcelain, and I throw each piece by hand on a potter’s wheel. Pattern is achieved by drawing, carving, or piercing into the clay. I aspire to make quiet, graceful forms that invite one to slow down: to take pause while discovering subtleties of form, surface, and function. These subtleties include the luminosity of porcelain, clean lines, curves, and delicate detail.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Takashi Ichihara

Granby, MA

I'm working with stoneware clay fired to a very high temperature. Firing is the most important process of my work because that makes the distinctive color and texture. Many of my pieces are wheel thrown and slab work together and the final forms are sculpted by wooden tools. I am challenged to create new images of functional stoneware.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Kina Crow

Allison Park, PA

Each piece is hand built utilizing coil, pinch and slab construction methods. I may also employ glazes that I make myself in the studio. This work is a narrative of my view of human behavior and the constant challenge of living with a wandering mind.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Nathan D. Falter

Springfield, MO

This work takes inspiration from the beginning of the industrial revolution--a time when things were mass produced but not fully mechanized. It was a moment when man was just beginning to master machine. These pieces embody the quirky nature of discovery and reflect a desire to revisit the past.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Ceramics
© 2002 - 2020 Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show. All rights reserved.
Privacy | Copyright

The Women's Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art
P.O. Box 7646
Philadelphia, PA 19101-7646
Phone: (215) 684-7930
E-mail twcpma@philamuseum.org

Subscribe to our eNews