NICOLE K. AQUILLANO

BOSTON, MA

Fascinated by the potential of place to define and connect us, I draw subtle narratives on functional work to elicit memories of times past. I am personally influenced by my longing to return to the comfort and stability of home, which I satisfy by creation of work documenting my past experiences. Architectural imagery drawn from my photographic collection - inlaid with intense attention to detail directly into the porcelain clay body and blurred by the movement of glaze - prompt display of my work when not in use, as a meaningful addition to any collection. I am particularly interested in exploring the human need to maintain collections, as a way to preserve the past and satisfy the longing with which we inhabit the world: driven by a desire to hold onto that which will inevitably be lost. My memories and experiences are carved onto objects intended to be both used and collected: as a way to facilitate new relationships to fill the void left by that which we will never have again.
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Meet the Artist: Rob Cartelli

Rob Cartelli’s functional and beautiful porcelain pottery was awarded the Jane and Leonard Korman Family Prize for Excellence in Clay at the 2014 PMA Craft Show.

How did you first get interested in working in your medium?

Nathan Falter

SPRINGFIELD, MO

This work takes inspiration from the beginning of the industrial revolution--a time when things were mass produced but not fully mechanized. It was a moment when man was just beginning to master machine. These pieces embody the quirky nature of discovery and reflect a desire to revisit the past. I work as immediately as possible; in small groups; six to a dozen pieces at a time. I use a limited pallet of very sensitive glazes and fire often in a small kiln. It is a chaotic work cycle but it is very informative. Almost every week I am looking at new pots laid out across the grass. Some pots come inside, some land in the garden. All of them inform and predict what is next. Clay is demanding. You can get caught up in one aspect forever. I'm trying to see the whole process: how a piece is made, how the surface is addressed, how it is fired, and finally how will it be used. I'm trying to compress this process into a moment of clarity; a poetic moment where the piece reveals itself.
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Gregg Rasmusson

ST. LOUIS, MO

I look to both nature and the manmade world for inspiration for my pottery. Like the clean bold designs of the modern era, from everyday objects to architecture. But I also draw on the subtle simplicity of nature. The way that nature enacts systematic yet slightly imperfect symmetry into living things. Even though I do make designs on my pieces I want them to look natural, as if they are part of the piece. My goal is to make it look like part of the piece, not a decoration drawn on. I like to work within the confines of traditional pottery forms, like a jar or vase, but at the same time push the boundaries of design. This helps keep the work relatable yet exciting at the same time.
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Meet the Ceramic Artist: 2013 Award Winner Cliff Lee

Cliff Lee came into prominence in 1993 when he was invited to contribute a piece of his work to the White House Collection of American Crafts. Two years later his work was in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery. His work can now be found in several major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Jonathan White

SOUTH PORTLAND, ME

I see beauty in both natural and industrial objects. A steel mill furnace being reclaimed by rust is as pleasing to me as the first fiddleheads of spring pushing from the ground. Form and function dictates their existence and it is happenstance that we find either beautiful or plain to behold. I hand build or throw each piece depending upon its scale and form. I seek a harmony between function and ornament to transform the vessel into a sculptural object.
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Ikuzi Teraki & Jeanne Bisson

WASHINGTON, VT

Utilitarian porcelain tableware and sculptural vase forms and wall pieces. The work is thrown, slab or handbuilt. The concept behind the work is to be useful as well as to challenge. We create drama in color, texture, form and weight.
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Simon Van der Ven

LINCOLNVILLE, ME

So often, people tell me,”I just want to touch your work.” I love hearing that. I form, carve, polish, and glaze to invite physical interaction. I am intrigued by pattern and look for those that I can understand phenomenologically rather than specifically. I know I have it right, when one person says, “That reminds me of coral,” another says, “lacy stinkhorn”, and another says, “blood vessels.” I make art as a way to understand the world I live in.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

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