Stephen and Tamberlaine Zeh

Temple, ME

Baskets hand crafted of brown ash trees selected in the Maine forest. They are made using the tools and methods of the Maine woodsmen, Shakers, and Native American basket makers. The process includes pounding an ash log to separate the growth rings, hand splitting, carving, green bending, and hand scraping.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Susan Lenz

Columbia, SC

Neglected skeins and recycled yarn are zigzag stitched into one-of-a-kind fiber vessels. There are no other substrata, just yarn and thread. Some vessels are have crackled interiors or include found objects encased in epoxy. Others are asymmetrical in shape or were created with open spaces. This is an ongoing series exploring the concepts of containment and the limits of the material.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

susan@susanlenz.com or mouse_house@prodigy.net

If you are interested in a FaceTime conversation or an audio call, please dial any of these numbers: (803) 254-0842; (803) 360-3035; (803) 606-9804.

Kari Lonning

Ridgefield, CT

Baskets are woven of artist-dyed rattan reed using commercial, water fast dyes. The techniques used are multi-element twining to achieve the spiral patterns, tapestry techniques to add spots or stripes of color and the artist's own hairy technique, where hundreds of short pieces of reed are woven into the walls of the baskets. All designs are original and all work is done by the artist.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Kari Lonning

Ridgefield, CT

Baskets are woven of artist-dyed rattan reed using commercial, water fast dyes. The techniques used are multi-element twining to achieve the spiral patterns, tapestry techniques to add spots or stripes of color and the artist's own hairy technique, where hundreds of short pieces of reed are woven into the walls of the baskets. All designs are original and all work is done by the artist.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Susan Lenz

Columbia, SC

Neglected skeins and recycled yarn are zigzag stitched into one-of-a-kind fiber vessels. There are no other substrata, just yarn and thread. Some vessels are have crackled interiors. Some include barbed wire or other found materials. Others are asymmetrical in shape or were created with open spaces. This is an ongoing series exploring the concepts of containment and the limits of the material.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Jill Heir

Reinholds, PA

While pursuing a successful career in engineering, my days were filled with specifications but my daydreams were of shapes, designs and forms of beauty. Contemplating the artistic beauty found in nature, I saw possibilities and a new path. I gathered my first batch of vines and reed and the weaving began. The artist behind the desk was freed. This inter-play between left and right brain, hands and materials, stimulates my creative process and leads my work in new directions.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Kari Lonning

Ridgefield, CT

Baskets are woven of artist-dyed rattan reed using commercial, water fast dyes. The techniques used are multi-element twining to achieve spiral and vertical patterns, and the artist's own hairy technique, where hundreds of short pieces of reed are woven into the walls of the baskets. The group photo shows brand new work woven of a local, invasive vine named Akebia.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Susan Lenz

Columbia, SC

Neglected skeins and recycled yarn are zigzag stitched into one-of-a-kind fiber vessels. There are no other substrata, just yarn and thread. Some vessels include embroidered wooden spools, rolled pages of text, barbed wire or other found metals. Others are asymmetrical in shape or were created with open spaces. These vessels are part of an ongoing series exploring the concepts of containment and the limits of the material.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Stephen Zeh

Temple, ME

Baskets hand crafted of brown ash trees selected in the Maine forest. They are made using the tools and methods of the Maine woodsmen, Shakers, and Native American basket makers. The process includes pounding an ash log to separate the growth rings, hand splitting, carving, green bending, and hand scraping.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Kari Lonning

Ridgefield, CT

The baskets are woven of artist-dyed rattan reed using commercial, water fast dyes. The techniques used are multi-element twining to achieve vertical and spiral patterns and a form of tapestry weaving to get patches of color. To achieve the hairy baskets, 100's of short pieces of reed have been woven into the walls of the baskets. When the basket weaving is finished, encaustic medium (beeswax and damar resin) is applied to the surface, then melted in to seal the reed.
You will be redirected to this artist’s online store. Transactions, communications and shipping arrangements are the sole responsibility of the artist and buyer.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Basketry
© 2002 - 2021 Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show. All rights reserved.
Privacy | Copyright

The Women's Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art
P.O. Box 7646
Philadelphia, PA 19101-7646
Phone: (215) 684-7930
E-mail twcpma@philamuseum.org

Subscribe to our eNews